Marx Vs Locke Essay

Locke Vs. Marx: Views On Property Rights

John Locke and Karl Marx, two of the most renowned political philosophers, had many contrasting views when it came the field of political philosophy. Most notably, private property rights ranked high among the plethora of disparities between these two individuals. The main issue at hand was whether or not private property was a natural right. Locke firmly believed that private property was an inherent right, whereas Marx argued otherwise. This essay will examine the views of both Locke and Marx on the subject of private property and will render insight on whose principles appear more credible.
Locke is best known for his philosophical ideals regarding the rights of humankind- all individuals have the right to life, liberty, and property.
The state of nature has a law of nature to govern it, which obliges every one: and reason, which is that law, teaches all mankind, who will but consult it, that being all equal and independent, no one ought to harm another in his life, health, liberty, or possessions (Locke, Ch. 2, Section 6).
The definition of natural rights, according to Locke, is that, “Everyone is born with an equality of certain rights, regardless of their nationality. Since they come from nature or from God, natural rights cannot be justly taken away without consent (Bill of Rights Institute).” Tying this into the idea on property rights, it is evident that Locke presumed God had given the earth to man to share collectively as a whole. Since God has given the world to humankind under commonality, he in turn has given them a right to utilize the world’s offerings to aid in the betterment of the peoples’ lives (Locke, Ch.5, Section 26). The following notion by Locke appears to but this idea into perspective:
Though the earth, and all inferior creatures, be common to all men, yet every man has a properly in his own person: this no body has any right to but himself The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his. Whatsoever then he removes out of the state that nature hath provided, and left it in, he hath mixed his labour with and joined to it something that is his own, and thereby makes it his property (Locke, Ch. 5, Section 27).
For example, a man who cultivates new land is therefore said to be in possession of that land, as well as all the goods (i.e. vegetables, fruits, grains, etc.) that the land provides.
Knowing that Locke views property as a basic right, he attempts to set forth a limit as to the share of property an individual can consume.
As much as any one can make use of to any advantage of life before it spoils, so much he may by his labour fix a property in: whatever is beyond this, is more than his share, and belongs to others. Nothing was made by God for man to spoil or destroy (Locke, Ch. 5, Section 31).
Under this constraint, Locke states that individuals are entitled to consume within reasonable means, insomuch that as long as property and land in the world are common amongst all, there...

Loading: Checking Spelling

0%

Read more

Marx’s Views on Religion vs. My Own

551 words - 2 pages Marx’s Views on Religion vs. My Own Karl Marx wrote that religion was, “an opiate of the people.” Although those words were not published in The German Ideology, they best describe his various views on religion. Marx wrote that there was a social relationship between the upper class or bourgeoisie and religion. The upper class that owned the means of production used religion as a tool to keep the working class or proletariat, oppressed and...

Scientific vs. Religious Views On Cloning.

1514 words - 6 pages Scientific vs. Religious Views on CloningFor many years man has driven himself to make new discoveries to better the life for mankind. We call these people scientists; they try to make new discoveries and take a scientific look at something and better it. Unfortunately, everyone does not always appreciate their discoveries or views and improvements on...

Natural Law Theory: with a focus on the views of Cicero and Locke.

1475 words - 6 pages The term 'natural law' is ambiguous in meaning, but it can essentially be defined as the principles of human conduct. Natural law derives from the nature of man and the world, just as physical law derives from the nature of space, time, and matter. According to natural law ethical theory, the moral standards that govern human behavior are, in some sense, objectively derived from the nature of human beings. The idea of a natural right order to...

English Colonists vs Native Americans: Property Rights in the New World

1206 words - 5 pages English colonists that came to settle the New World had one conception of what property was; in their minds, property equaled money. This differed greatly from the Native Americans’ perspective, where property equaled survival. When the English colonists took land that naturally belonged to the Indians under the rights of the charter given to them by the English Crown, they misconstrued many of the conceptions of property that the...

Comparing Lenin vs. Marx by mundeazy. Lenin's views were heavily influenced by Karl Marx's The Communist Manifesto.

727 words - 3 pages Lenin's views were heavily influenced by Karl Marx's The Communist Manifesto. Lenin along with his close friend, Leonid Trotsky, took key theories from Marx's writing and adapted them to help revolutionize Russia. The Bolsheviks principles were...

Examining Contending Views on Human Nature: Mancius vs. Xunzi

2039 words - 8 pages Examining Contending Views on Human Nature: Mancius vs. Xunzi Throughout human intellectual history, mankind has debated the question: “are humans good by nature?” Do humans do good out of only self-centered motivations, or is there an internal built-in sense of morality? Today, we face this problem more than ever. For example, if a lawyer argues a killer’s intentions for committing heinous crimes originate from the fact that he has a...

My Views on: Liberals vs. Conservatives

993 words - 4 pages Until recently, we have lived in a social product, being post WW2 capitalism, that was in part shaped by the rise of the "organized/unionized" working class of the 1930s and 40s, and the threat of the end of "private capitalism" that was, at least, the early promise of what came to be, I say, inaccurately called "Communism". (I generally see it as more a kind of "state run" capitalism. Which is what it has effectively become.)The fear of both...

The Implications of Different Views on Animal Rights

1331 words - 5 pages Should animals and humans have the same rights? Or, the same penalty for their abuse? Have you just sat back and wondered how we got where we are today? Should animals be lower than humans or the same? With the advancing of new technology, medications and medical advancements haven’t we gained this knowledge by animal testing/ animal cruelty? Do we, as humans, think animal testing/ animal cruelty and domestic violence all have similarities and...

Aristotle Vs. Epicurus. Dealing largly with their views on their ideal societys. Ultimately points to Epicurus as superior

1059 words - 4 pages While Aristotle makes some valid points in his argument for participating in the polis, Epicurus offers us the total package, which will, in the end, provide the citizens with a more "pleasant" life overall. This pleasantry without the pageantry of politics will aid in the living of a life that is...

Locke Vs. Locke

1174 words - 5 pages For many political theorists and thinkers, the ideas of labor and property are central to the evolution of governments or states, and henceforth, very important aspects of human life. For some writers, the development of property is a direct result of labor, and government is set up to ensure the property rights of those who own property. Some view property and labor fundamentally or naturally connected aspects of human life, while others see...

Marxist Locke

2524 words - 10 pages Marxist Locke Karl Marx and John Locke both place a great deal of importance in both labour and property in discussing their political philosophies. At first glance, the two thinkers seem to possess completely different ideas on property, its importance, and the form of society which should grow from it. The disparity in their beliefs is evident, but they share a similar approach to labour and acceptable conditions while constructing...

John Locke versus Karl Marx Essay

1259 Words6 Pages

Two of the most influential and celebrated modern political thinkers, Karl Marx and John Locke, have made countless insightful and compelling arguments, expressing their ideas on various conditions of the individual, state, and the interactions between the two. Marx was a German political thinker who was best known for his works with idea of communism and social class divisions. Locke was an English philosopher famous for his social contract and is known as the Father of Liberalism (CITE). Despite the paramount success these men achieved, they had radically different views on the idea of property and the description of freedom, finding only minimal similarity on their views on the right to revolt. The concept of property has developed…show more content…

Two of the most influential and celebrated modern political thinkers, Karl Marx and John Locke, have made countless insightful and compelling arguments, expressing their ideas on various conditions of the individual, state, and the interactions between the two. Marx was a German political thinker who was best known for his works with idea of communism and social class divisions. Locke was an English philosopher famous for his social contract and is known as the Father of Liberalism (CITE). Despite the paramount success these men achieved, they had radically different views on the idea of property and the description of freedom, finding only minimal similarity on their views on the right to revolt. The concept of property has developed many different perspectives over the years as political philosophers continually searched to find its rightful role in society. Of these perspectives, John Locke and Karl Marx had perhaps developed the most combative and different views. In Locke’s Second Treatise of Government, he discusses how it is a natural right for all men to have private property, and the protection of this right should be a top priority of the government. In fact, one of Locke’s most influential quotes states that all men have the right to “life, liberty, and property.” (CITE) This later became the groundwork for some concepts used by the Founding Fathers of the United States. In the eyes of Locke, “labour being the unquestionable property of the labourer, no man but

Show More

Comments

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *