Chicago Citation Sample Essay

Chicago style referencing is one of the less popular referencing styles in the academia. Yet, it is still widely used by scholars & researchers all over the world. The basic document explaining the rules & standards of Chicago style is called “The Chicago Manual of Style, 16th edition”, organization's website is chicagomanualofstyle.org. The manual itself is available for sale at online bookstores; however, there is also a great deal of information about this style online. 

Whatever type of referencing you have, Privatewriting is able to provide the research and reference it according to your specifications. We have delivered literary thousands of papers and formatted them according to MLA, APA, Harvard & Chicago styles to our customers’ satisfaction.


ESSAY FORMAT


Paper. Use standard white A4 paper (8.5”x11”).

Font. Use a legible font like Times New Roman, size 12.

Margins. Margins should be from 1” to 1.5” inches on all sides.

Page numbering. The title page is not numbered. The next page after the title one starts with ‘1’ in the upper right-hand corner. Arabic numerals are used for page numbers; pages are numbered consecutively.

Title Page

1. Type the title of your paper in UPPER CASE.
2. Place it one-third down from the top of the page, you will need to press Enter 7 times. Center your title.
3. Hit Enter 8 times.
5. Type your first name and last name. Press Enter
6. Type the name of your class. Press Enter
7. Type the current date.

Here is a sample title page arranged according to Chicago Style.

Spacing. Use double space throughout your paper.

Indentation. Every new paragraph should be indented. Press TAB to indent your text.

Citation. There are two major ways of citing your sources: footnote format & endnote format. Some scholars call footnote format Chicago Style 16A, while endnote format is called Chicago Style 16B. Schematically, here is what the Chicago Style looks like:

Footnotes/Endnotes or Author-Date system? Which format is right for me?

The short answer would be: refer to your assignment requirements. If you can’t see it or there is no specific requirement, use the following information to determine correct formatting.

Footnote/ Endnote style is mostly preferred in such branches of science as literature, history, and arts. So, if it applies to you, choose that option.

The author-date style is used in the social sciences, so if you study things like economics, history, law, linguistics, psychology, sociology, international relations, anthropology, communication, education, culture, and couple other socially oriented disciplines, the endnote style is exactly what you want.

Footnote/Endnote Style

Footnote/Endnote style requires the use of superscript numbers following the quote or the information taken from a given book/journal. Footnotes/Endnotes are numbered consecutively and their listing on the bibliography page is not necessarily alphabetical – instead, they are numbered in order of appearance. Every superscript number should have corresponding information about the author & the publication in the footnote section or the bibliography page.

Footnotes VS Endnotes

The major difference between footnotes and endnotes is that footnotes contain information about bibliography at the end of the page (at the footer), while the endnote style implies that information about your books is provided at the very end of your paper, in the bibliography section. Hence their names: footnotes come at the foot of the page, while endnotes are placed at its end.

Author/Date Style

This style is often called the ‘bibliography style’ or ‘Chicago Style 16B’. In its form, it’s very similar to APA or MLA style formatting since it requires the author to cite the author by the last name and provide the year of publication in parentheses.

This style requires no numbering of your sources, in contrast, all of your books, journals, articles should be listed in alphabetical order on a separate page called ‘bibliography’ or ‘references’. Every entry should start with a new line and have the so-called ‘hanging line’ protruding into the margin by 1 inch.

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Go to Author-Date: Sample Citations

The following examples illustrate the notes and bibliography system. Sample notes show full citations followed by shortened citations for the same sources. Sample bibliography entries follow the notes. For more details and many more examples, see chapter 14 of The Chicago Manual of Style. For examples of the same citations using the author-date system, follow the Author-Date link above.

Book

Notes

Shortened notes

Bibliography entries (in alphabetical order)

For many more examples, covering virtually every type of book, see 14.100–163 in The Chicago Manual of Style.

Chapter or other part of an edited book

In a note, cite specific pages. In the bibliography, include the page range for the chapter or part.

Note

Shortened note

Bibliography entry

In some cases, you may want to cite the collection as a whole instead.

Note

Shortened note

Bibliography entry

For more examples, see 14.103–5 and 14.106–12 in The Chicago Manual of Style.

Translated book

Note

Shortened note

Bibliography entry

E-book

For books consulted online, include a URL or the name of the database. For other types of e-books, name the format. If no fixed page numbers are available, cite a section title or a chapter or other number in the notes, if any (or simply omit).

Notes

Shortened notes

Bibliography entries (in alphabetical order)

For more examples, see 14.159–63 in The Chicago Manual of Style.

Journal article

In a note, cite specific page numbers. In the bibliography, include the page range for the whole article. For articles consulted online, include a URL or the name of the database. Many journal articles list a DOI (Digital Object Identifier). A DOI forms a permanent URL that begins https://doi.org/. This URL is preferable to the URL that appears in your browser’s address bar.

Notes

Shortened notes

Bibliography entries (in alphabetical order)

Journal articles often list many authors, especially in the sciences. If there are four or more authors, list up to ten in the bibliography; in a note, list only the first, followed by et al. (“and others”). For more than ten authors (not shown here), list the first seven in the bibliography, followed by et al.

Note

Shortened note

Bibliography entry

For more examples, see 14.168–87 in The Chicago Manual of Style.

News or magazine article

Articles from newspapers or news sites, magazines, blogs, and the like are cited similarly. Page numbers, if any, can be cited in a note but are omitted from a bibliography entry. If you consulted the article online, include a URL or the name of the database.

Notes

Shortened notes

Bibliography entries (in alphabetical order)

Readers’ comments are cited in the text or in a note but omitted from a bibliography.

Note

For more examples, see 14.188–90 (magazines), 14.191–200 (newspapers), and 14.208 (blogs) in The Chicago Manual of Style.

Book review

Note

Shortened note

Bibliography entry

Interview

Note

Shortened note

Bibliography entry

Thesis or dissertation

Note

Shortened note

Bibliography entry

Website content

It is often sufficient simply to describe web pages and other website content in the text (“As of May 1, 2017, Yale’s home page listed . . .”). If a more formal citation is needed, it may be styled like the examples below. For a source that does not list a date of publication or revision, include an access date (as in example note 2).

Notes

Shortened notes

Bibliography entries (in alphabetical order)

For more examples, see 14.205–10in The Chicago Manual of Style. For multimedia, including live performances, see 14.261–68.

Social media content

Citations of content shared through social media can usually be limited to the text (as in the first example below). A note may be added if a more formal citation is needed. In rare cases, a bibliography entry may also be appropriate. In place of a title, quote up to the first 160 characters of the post. Comments are cited in reference to the original post.

Text

Notes

Shortened notes

Bibliography entry

Personal communication

Personal communications, including email and text messages and direct messages sent through social media, are usually cited in the text or in a note only; they are rarely included in a bibliography.

Note

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